April 18, 2015

Why I Love the Mountains


Mountains are magnetic, and we are drawn to them. Maybe it’s because of what they force us to do, or become. We gaze upon them, we exalt them, then we climb them. On their paths we face hardship, but these we welcome because hardship helps us discover things we didn’t know or understand before, about ourselves.

On their summit we feel inspired, because we see how far we have come, and how much we have endured to be there. In that moment, when we stand in the sky, everything we see is surreal and far away. But what we feel is raw, and present.   

To climb a mountain, we can’t just want it. We have to hunger for it. When we want to climb a mountain but don’t hunger for it, we are easily distracted. Every mountain is different, and each presents different hardships and opportunity to discover. We are drawn to certain mountains at different times, and we can't control which mountain we are hungry for. But we need to recognize when we are truly hungry, or only just wanting. 

I’m beginning to realize I’ve been climbing the same mountain for a long time, yet there is another mountain that beckons. One that will undoubtedly bring a new set of challenges, but one that makes me hungry again.

I think it is time for me to explore.

March 31, 2015

Interview with World Record Holder Zach Bitter



On a cold winter morning in Phoenix, Arizona, some of the fastest ultra runners in the country lined up on a track at Central High School. The year was 2013 and the event was the Desert Solstice Invitational Track Meet. One of the athletes was a little known high school teacher from Madison, Wisconsin, Zack Bitter.

As the day progressed, and the miles ticked away, there was one runner who seemed to be moving faster than all the others. It was Zack Bitter, who continued to move through 70, 80 and 90 miles on pace to set records. In the end, Zack delivered, setting a new American record by running 100 miles in 11:47:21 and a new world record by running 101.66 miles in 12 hours. 

Zach is a believer in the OFM diet and Vespa, which was developed to maximize the body’s ability to burn fat for fuel. I caught up with Zach via email recently during his busy training schedule. Here is the conversation, unabridged.


Q: Zach, tell me a little about yourself. Where did you grow up? Were you competitive as a child? What sports did you compete in?

I guess I grew up in the Midwest. At a young age my family moved from Nebraska to Wisconsin while I was in elementary school. I have lived in Wisconsin ever since. I competed in any sport I could when I was young. I found out in middle school that I could either get my butt kicked in sprints or win/podium in distance races. In high school and college I wasn’t spectacular by any means. I did well as a D3 athlete in high school, and was what I would call an average runner amongst athletes in a top tier DIII collegiate conference (WIAC Conference) when running for the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point.

Q: Looking back, how did these experiences shape you as a runner today?

It has taught me the power of setting goals and working hard for them. I wouldn’t say I am overly talented, so I’ve always put in the time to reach my full potential.

Q: How long have you been running and why did you get into it?

I got into distance running in middle school. I found out when doing the Presidential Physical Fitness challenge in PE class that I was much better at distance than sprints. Like most middle school age boys, I wanted to win, so I gravitated towards distance.

Q: I know you are a teacher. Do you have a family? How do you balance running with your career and family life?

I am single, but am pretty close to my parents and three sisters. Balance is key to any training plan, but I certainly make sacrifices to be able to put in upwards of 20 hours of training per week. I strongly believe that you need to pursue your passions in life regardless of what they are. For me, that is running and challenging myself through endurance. When you really respect your passions it’s much easier to make time to fully dedicate. I think lots of people forget how to rationally detach from their job or other “obligations” in life. That is something I’ve gotten really good at. With training and racing being my biggest passion hitting the roads, trails, track, etc. becomes easy even after a long day.

Q; Its been said runners, especially ultra runners, are a little nuts. Are you?

Haha, I suppose so. I think “being nuts” is somewhat of a relative term. Personally, I think it would be nuts not to chase your passion. I guess my passion is obscure enough yet that most people would consider it a bit crazy.

Q: I’ve heard you say you are better at longer distances, which is why you gravitated to ultras. How much of your talent is mental strength vs physical strength?

I think that people range significantly in their margin of depreciation over distance. Some of this is probably genetic, but also training the systems differently. I really love training my aerobic zone, so simply by doing what I love most probably would cause me to gravitate to longer races. Mental strength or keeping a positive attitude are key in ultras. Nutrition is huge as well. The ability to push through rough patches, and keep your digestive system from limiting you is very important in the latter stages of ultra-events. I guess I am not sure if one or the other is stronger than the other. I definitely spend lots of time working on both. I think there is something to be said about practicing positive self-talk in all areas of life. It makes a good habit to remain positive even through tough times.

Q: Can you explain your training philosophy?

It is based on feel. Obviously, there are key workouts that I research, try, and morph in a way that works for me, but ultimately it comes down to listening to your body. Training really hard does you no good if you can’t recover. This differs from person to person. It’s a growing process. As a person gets stronger and more adapted to the rigors of training there training regimen can also change. This makes it best to listen to your body. If you are dialed in nutritionally, with sleep, managing stress, respecting your easy days and going hard on hard days; your body will tell you what you can do.

Q: How many hours per week do you train? Can you (briefly) break this down by workout type (base, hills, intervals, long run, cross training etc)?

I do approximately 20 hours a week when I combine cross training activities; like strength training. I really couldn’t say that there is any specific routine I follow consistently. I base my training on my A races. This usually averages out to be between 100-150 miles per week; with a bit less on taper and recovery weeks.

Q: How do you stay motivated?

Motivation is easy, because it is my passion. Finding your passion in life is big. I’m blessed to have discovered mine. It kind of makes motivation a non-factor.

Q: Do you train mentally?

Indirectly, yes. I don’t do any really in-depth meditation or anything like that, but mental strategies develop themselves throughout the whole training process.

Q: What one or two things do you believe separate you from other runners, things that give you an added edge in competition?
It’s hard to say, because I don’t always know what makes everyone else tick, or if it is similar or different than me. I definitely follow a unique diet that would be considered amongst the minority.

Q: You’ve been an advocate of the Optimal Fat Metabolism (OFM) diet and Vespa. There is a lot of literature on OFM, but can you briefly explain what this is and how this and Vespa have impacted your running?

In its most basic sense, OFM is finding a way within your person specific lifestyle to train your body to recognize fat as its primary source of fuel. It can take patience to find what each person’s specific ratios are, and planning carb use strategically throughout varying training phases, but the end result is the same. A much greater ability to metabolize fat. Vespa is nature’s catalyst in promoting the metabolization of fat. It helps you with the process of making fat as your primary fuel. Vespa allows me to optimize my fat metabolism and minimizes the negative impacts of the few carbs I do eat.

Q: Does your training diet differ from your racing diet? Please explain.

It depends how you look at it. On paper it differs greatly. I go from eating mostly fat to mostly carbs. With that said, I am taking in a significantly lower amount of carbs on race day than I needed to when I followed a high carb approach. I follow the principal of “strategic carb use” whether I am racing or in training. Obviously, when I am running all day long, my caloric demand is much different than a typical day, so the strategy of carbs usage changes.

Q: Do you ever take time off from training and racing? For how long, and how does this fit into your overall plan?  

I listen to my body completely. Because I don’t generate tons of inflammation and oxidative stress by metabolizing carbohydrates constantly; I am able to recover much quicker. Baring on 8 day stint where I had a bit of hamstring injury, I have not taken a full week off in years. If you respect your easy days you have much less need for long bouts of off time.

Q: Looking back, what has been your ultimate achievement as a runner?

I would say Desert Solstice 2013. Breaking an American and World Record was pretty exciting. It also really opened my eyes to the road and track ultra-world. Consistent environment gives you the opportunity to measure yourself against time and history.

Q, What would be your ultimate achievement looking ahead?

I definitely want to find my ultimate limit in the 100 mile distance. I would love to be able to say that I know for sure I went as fast as my body would allow at that distance.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve been given?

Follow your passions in life. Forcing yourself into things you do not want to do; whether it be a job or activity is not worth it.

Q: Who do you draw your inspiration from? Why?

I don’t think I draw inspiration from any one person. Inspiration comes from all experiences. I have been blessed to witness and meet tons of people doing really inspiring things and following their dreams. All those experiences add up to what inspires me. 

March 22, 2015

Thank You Alto Vista Peak – You’ll Do Just Fine!

Alto Vista - The One

Being bitch slapped by the mountains is kind of a double-edged sword. On one hand, you have a plan – meticulously crafted by the ego – that choreographs your grand summit. Here simple alpine fundamentals take a backseat to visions of self, standing high upon a pinnacle overlooking mankind. Then there’s reality. Or all the little details that spring-up while you dwell in fantasy during your trek. Wait, what? Oh, I didn’t think of that.

For us Southern California flatlanders, San Gorgonio is kind of a Grand Teton. Even though we can’t see it from Orange County (unless standing on Santiago Peak), it’s always beckoning. So when I signed the day hike permit, the vision was simple. Get to the top. The pinnacle. What else is there?

I began to look a little more into the details. My route from South Fork to the summit and back was 21 miles with around 5,000 feet of ascent. No big deal. Hell, I’m an ultra runner, I thought. I’m invincible!


San G - The Elusive One 
The first couple of miles were amazing. Meandering single track with some great glimpses of San G. I was so sure to bring my Olympus Pen camera that I hung it around my neck so I could get the best shots without having to dig into my pack. The pictures I was getting were amazing! I’m not sure if was the 10th or 11th shot when I noticed something blinking in the view finder. “NO CARD.” “NO CARD.”

Santiago Peak - The Flatlander's Vantage Point
Whatever. Since I didn’t have my GPS, I was calculating my distance by landmarks along the way. Two miles, four miles. What I didn’t calculate were the snow drifts. A step here. A slip there. A contorted epileptic move here and there. Finally I reached Dollar Lake Saddle at 10,000 feet, 7.4 miles in. It was covered in snow. Hell, I thought, this is where the real climbing will begin! After taking a few shots with my phone, I moved further up the snow to get to the trail. Wait, what?

From Alto Vista Peak
No trail? I looked around feverously. For footprints, snowshoe tracks, coyote droppings, anything. But there was nothing. Then it hit me. The two and a half mile trail to San G summit was completely buried under several feet of snow. Details.

Wait. What? 
At this point my vision of pinnacle grandeur was fading into just bagging any old summit I could find. So off I marched, heading due west, the opposite direction of San G, but toward the many peaks along the 10,000 foot ridge. I finally found one. Alto Vista Peak. I stood on the “pinnacle” for a few minutes, soaking in everything I could.

Thanks Alto Vista Peak. You'll do just fine.

March 20, 2015

Catalina Island Marathon - A Video

It started out as just a fun weekend. Somehow it turned into a quest to use my GoPro for the first time to film my first experience running this epic 38 year old marathon. Thanks to Chris C for sharing all his wisdom while playing it so cool.

It was a blast out there and I hope you enjoy the video!

Catalina Island Marathon from Will C on Vimeo.

March 8, 2015

Memories capture a space in time. But laughter helps reveal


When we finally pulled up to the farm, it was well past 10 o’clock at night. The air was bitter cold. We drove a rusted-out, orange VW Thing with no heater and a cracked windshield. Why I agreed to accompany my friend on this 2,000 mile road trip from Chicago to California, I will never know.


We weren’t more than an hour out of Chicago when the car began to sputter and violently backfire. The mechanic at the next gas station just shook his head. “Not much I can do for ya boys,” I remember hearing. We just kept driving. Clueless about what could happen, naïve enough to keep going. We were headed towards a small farmhouse in Gravity, Iowa, home to my Aunt Carol and Uncle Jim.

When we finally rolled onto the farm, I had never been so cold in my life. We’d been driving for 10 hours in what felt like a convertible on a Siberian expressway. Every part of my body was either shaking, shriveled or had gone completely missing. I wore everything I had – a parka, layers of shirts and socks, gloves, a beanie. I even had an improvised face mask made from an extra sweatshirt, used primarily to keep my nose from freezing, but also to protect my face from lacerations if and when the windshield blew out. 



I don’t think Aunt Carol and Uncle Jim could’ve been more entertained as when they saw us. They couldn’t stop laughing as we peeled ourselves from this frozen tin can. That was many years ago. That we made it all the way to California against such odds was never discussed at family reunions. But the improvised face mask? Jim would never let me forget it. His laughter when we reminisced, well, it said it all, and reminded me of how absurd my excursion really was.


This last weekend our family attended Uncle Jim’s funeral near that small farm in Iowa. During my stay I was able to see some sites, hear some great stories and run a bit on the rural roads. I got a little flavor of the lifestyle that drew him back from California to the little town in Iowa where he grew up as a child. A place where he tended to horses, built barns, refurbished classic cars and generally lived life on his terms.

Memories are the glue that keep families connected, and they capture a place in time. And it’s the laughter that helps reveal these moments.

Thanks Uncle Jim, for your laugh. We will miss you.


















February 28, 2015

Guest Post - Why I run



By: Greg Z
North Carolina 

A rare winter storm in southeastern North Carolina left the area enveloped in ice Wednesday morning. For me as a runner, any kind of abnormality in the weather is a stimulus to get me out the door, and into Mother Nature's fold.

I was surprised when I entered the Carolina Beach State Park. There was so much ice covering the trees, and conditions didn't seem nearly as bad in town. Numerous smaller trees were bent across the trails from the weight of ice on them, creating an almost tunnel like course in sections of the park.

But when I got into a bit of clearing in the woods I was able to behold the beauty of what the storm had produced. The tall straight pines, the young saplings, the small bushy trees that grow in the marshes, the bare deciduous trees, the clumpy swamp grasses...were all covered in a layer of whitish, gray ice...as if one shook up a snow globe and let the contents ever-so-softy land on top of what lay beneath.

I felt like I was witnessing something rarely seen – an artist's rendering left out in the open, for us mere mortals to be momentarily immersed in its grandeur. I looked with child-like awe every which way as I made my way back into the woods.

On the trail spur by the Cape Fear River I heard a seemingly desperate squawking as an egret took flight from the marsh and circled past me and out over the river before returning back to land. I took notice that the reeds were coated in ice as well, and looked like thousands of ice picks frozen into the ground. I would be disturbed too, I thought, and I felt empathy for the large bird as I carefully crossed an icy, wooden foot bridge.

Later in the run the sun began to poke through the thick ceiling of smoky gray clouds. As it did the ice started to melt, and fall! Rounding a bend on a trail, I heard a loud cracking snap, as a huge pine branch snapped off and crashed thru the surrounding trees onto the forest floor. Time to get out of here I said to myself.


This is ultimately why I run. And why I continue to run. To be a visceral part of days such as yesterday. To witness firsthand.



February 19, 2015

Freezing Ass In Washington D.C.

 National Cathedral

Who would have thought? A trip back east from sunny So Cal to Washington D.C. And wham! A snow storm and the coldest day of the year. 





Icicles Under Washington
Frozen Potomac 

Frozen Creek - Whitehaven Trail

I sucked it up for the first few days, snow running in 14 degrees along the Whitehaven trail and the streets of D.C. Made it to the National Cathedral, down to the C&O canal, and then to the frozen Potomac River. Icicles, bone chilling wind, black ice. Even a stop by my old stomping grounds, the Russell Senate Office Building, where I worked as an intern for Sen. Ted Kennedy (many years ago). What more could one ask for?

Senate Office Building - What Was I Thinking? 


Turns out the forecast for tomorrow is 0 degrees. I’ve never run in 0. But I’m going to give it a go. A pair of sweats for my scrawny legs, compression socks and shorts. A higher pitched voice. I’m in.   

I just hope I can breathe in 0 degrees. TBD.